5 Tips for Promoting Your Content on Social Media

It can be tough coming up with new content to promote on social media. With so many seemingly great ideas out there, it can be tough to think of new ideas.

Thousands upon thousands of posts go live on social media each day, some from family and friends, some from businesses trying their best to grab your attention.

Here are a few ideas you can use to start creating more content on social media and promoting your brand.

If you like this content, make sure to follow me on social media for more ways you can grow your brand!

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Call to Action Buttons

Donations, followers, comments, stories. There are plenty of things you can ask people who see your content for.

Usually, a call to action button asks people to learn more information, or browse your products, but it is possible to make a button that can do just about anything.

Giving followers an opportunity and an easier way to explore your content instead of making them go searching for your website.

There are plenty of amazing examples of Call to Action Buttons, and some tips on how to write a good one, that you can find here.


Different Content for Different Channels

Each platform has its preference of content.

Just because something works on one platform it doesn’t mean it would work on another.

It’s important to know what each platform prefers and what works on those platforms. Instagram might be good for short videos, where Facebook prefers longer.

Do your research and make sure you know what content you need.

It doesn’t always need to be a brand new idea, but maybe think about changing how the message is given to audiences.


Use Appropriate Hashtags

There is a hashtag for everything. No matter what your content, there are trending hashtags that are used commonly by people in the industry.

Research your industry and find those hashtags to find out what people are using. This will put your content in front of others who are interested in the genre.

Usually there are more than one hashtags that are popular in the industry, so do your due diligence to make sure you can find the most effective ones.


Fill Out the Profile Information

This may seem like a simple idea, but filling out your profile information will give people a way to contact you, and better understand what to expect from you.

Even filling out basic information like the ‘About’ page and contact information will mean people will need to do that much less work to find your content.


Add a branded hashtag

Like I mentioned before, hashtags are a way to find people who are interested in a certain type of content.

The same can work for your profile. On most social media platforms, you can add a hashtag to your profile so that your profile pops up when someone searches that hashtag.

It’s no guarantee to be seen, but it gives you a better opportunity to be seen by people in the same field as yourself.


NetGalley eArc Review: The Seventh Perfection by Daniel Polansky

This is going to be a short review, because honestly I don’t have anything to say about this book other than why I didn’t like it.

I try to find the good in books, but this is probably the worst book I have ever read.


Title: The Seventh Perfection
Author: Daniel Polansky
Page Count: 176
Genre: Fantasy Novella
Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

When a woman with perfect memory sets out to solve a riddle, the threads she tugs on could bring a whole city crashing down. The God-King who made her is at risk, and his other servants will do anything to stop her.

To become the God-King’s Amanuensis, Manet had to master all seven perfections, developing her body and mind to the peak of human performance. She remembers everything that has happened to her, in absolute clarity, a gift that will surely drive her mad. But before she goes, Manet must unravel a secret which threatens not only the carefully prepared myths of the God-King’s ascent, but her own identity and the nature of truth itself.

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The Seventh Perfection was 176 pages of a waste of time. Throughout the entire story I didn’t figure out what the point of the story was, where it was going, or how any of the stories overlapped.

I had no idea what was happening at any point, I wasn’t even sure if our main character was male, female, or human half the time.

When I thought I understood what was happening, something would happen in the story and I would be more confused and lost than before.

I’ll give the author credit for writing a story in the second perspective. It’s a very rare situation, but honestly not sure it was worth it.

Maybe it was just me. Maybe I was the reason the story didn’t make sense, but I can honestly say the only thing that I liked from the book was the idea that people spent their lives learning these different “perfections” to serve the ruler.


I am sorry to disappoint everyone with this review. I don’t have the best luck for books I look out for on NetGalley, I seem to always be disappointed in them, but one day I will find one I enjoy!

Quote of the Day: Mysteries

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“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existence. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery each day.
― Albert Einstein

“Margo always loved mysteries. And in everything that came afterward, I could never stop thinking that maybe she loved mysteries so much that she became one.” 
― John Green, Paper Towns

“The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery.” 
― Anais Nin


“Stars, too, were time travelers. How many of those ancient points of light were the last echoes of suns now dead? How many had been born but their light not yet come this far? If all the suns but ours collapsed tonight, how many lifetimes would it take us to realize we were alone? I had always known the sky was full of mysteries—but not until now had I realized how full of them the earth was.” 
― Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

“Nothing whets the intelligence more than a passionate suspicion, nothing develops all the faculties of an immature mind more than a trail running away into the dark.” 
― Stefan Zweig, The Burning Secret and other stories

“The sweetest smiles hold the darkest secrets…” 
― Sara Shepard, Flawless


“Once there were brook trout in the streams in the mountains. You could see them standing in the amber current where the white edges of their fins wimpled softly in the flow. They smelled of moss in your hand. Polished and muscular and torsional. On their backs were vermiculate patterns that were maps of the world in its becoming. Maps and mazes. Of a thing which could not be put back. Not be made right again. In the deep glens where they lived all things were older than man and they hummed of mystery.” 
― Cormac McCarthy, The Road

“No, I would not want to live in a world without dragons, as I would not want to live in a world without magic, for that is a world without mystery, and that is a world without faith.” 
― R.A. Salvatore, Streams of Silver

“Well, good-bye for now,” he said, rolling his neck as if we hadn’t been talking about anything important at all. He bowed at the waist, those wings vanishing entirely, and had begun to fade into the nearest shadow when he went rigid.
His eyes locked on mine wide and wild, and his nostrils flared. Shock—pure shock flashed across his features at whatever he saw on my face, and he stumbled back a step. Actually stumbled. 
“What is—” I began.
He disappeared—simply disappeared, not a shadow in sight—into the crisp air.” 
― Sarah J. Maas, A Court of Thorns and Roses


“In my experience, boys are predictable. As soon as they think of something, they do it. Girls are smarter—they plan ahead. They think about not getting caught.” 
― Eoin Colfer, Half-Moon Investigations

“Every solution to every problem is simple. It’s the distance between the two where the mystery lies.” 
― Derek Landy, Skulduggery Pleasant

“Love is an endless mystery, because there is no reasonable cause that could explain it.” 
― Rabindranath Tagore


5 Things You’re Doing Wrong on Social Media

If you’re using social media to promote or market anything, you’ll want them to reach the most people as possible.

But, in these times when social media rules seem to be ever changing, there are plenty of things you could be doing that can hurt your social media presence instead of helping it.

I’ve given you 5 things you might be doing wrong, but there’s no shame in it.

This isn’t an exact science, so what’s wrong for one person might be right for another. These are just general guidelines to follow to get the most success possible.

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1. You’re Not Engaging in Your Community

A big part of growing on social media is knowing and interacting with the community. Like similar content, comment on posts, reply to other’s comments. These simple things will get your name out there for more people to see, plus it often leaves you in a positive light with others in the community.

If you ignore the community, your social channels will likely not grow as quickly.

A bonus of engaging with the community is that you can get a sense of what content they enjoy and what content they don’t.


2. You’re Over Posting, Under Posting, or Posting Inconsistently

Platforms like Twitter allow you to have a conversation by posting more tweets. That’s not the same for platforms like Facebook and Instagram.

Posting too often on Facebook or Instagram might annoy your audiences, but posting too infrequently, your audience won’t be interested in what you have to say.

A consistent schedule allows your followers to know when to expect your content, even if they don’t realize it.

It’s tough to find the perfect amount of times to post per week, but its best to test it out before you go too crazy in either direction. Try posting 2-3 times per week at first, and make notes of the stats on those posts.

Then, post more or less often and examine those results. You’ll likely notice a positive or negative change. Use those results to find the perfect posting schedule for your content.


3. You Haven’t Put Much Thought Into It

Not every social media platform might work for you. Just because Twitter is popular, doesn’t mean its right for you. The same applies to all platforms.

You don’t have to join a certain social media platform just because “everyone else does.” Take the time and find the social media platforms that will work best for your style, and the style of your content.

Focus on one platform at a time. Understand how it works and build it up. Once you’ve established yourself to a level you find comfortable, then you can focus on a second platform.

The same applies to your content. Many people don’t find success on social media because they aren’t posting relevant content.

Take a few hours at the beginning of every month and plan your content for a few weeks. It might change if things come up or become impossible to do, but scheduling your content before hand will leave you less stressed and posting more relevant content.


4. You’re Not Telling People Where to Find You

If you’ve heard of the movie Field of Dreams, you might assume “If you Build it, They will Come” is true for everything.

That’s not how social media works. You can create the best content in the world, but if nobody knows it exists, it won’t be seen.

Share your content on other platforms. Let people know on your blog, in your videos, or wherever you create content.

It will let them know your social media channels exist, and remind them if they haven’t followed you yet.


5. You’re Not Willing to Change

The biggest part of growing on any platform is the ability to change. You need to adapt to new interests, changes in your audience’s likes and dislikes, as well as new trends in the community.

If you’re not allowing yourself to change and learn from your past, you’re not going to get better. Your content will become old and your numbers won’t increase.

Don’t shut down any criticism. Accept it and learn how you can change from it.

Book Review: The Fool’s Folly by Keith Moray

I received this book as an eARC from NetGalley in return for an honest review of it. 

I don’t often read mystery, but when I do, I enjoy the thrill of it.

Mystery novels can have an unsatisfying end, which ruins the entirety of the book, and mystery novels can have characters jump to some wild conclusions for the sake of wrapping up all the loose ends. 

It is a tough line to walk, making the character learn enough to solve all the clues, but when done well it makes the story much better.

If you enjoy this review, make sure to follow me on social media for more content.

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Trust no one…

1485, Yorkshire, England

King Richard III has held the English throne for two years. But the country is rife with rumours about the fate of his nephews, the two princes imprisoned in the Tower of London, and there is a continual threat of rebellion by Henry Tudor.

King Richard’s heir, John de la Pole, presides over the stronghold of Sandal Castle. When a suspicious death occurs in his household, he instructs Sir Giles Beeston, the newly appointed judge, to the Manor Court to investigate.

But before Sir Giles can get to the bottom of the murder, more grisly deaths occur.

Are the deaths connected? Is there a plot against the King?

And can Sir Giles unmask the killer before he too falls victim to the killer…?

Title: The Fool’s Folly 
Author: Keith Moray
Rating: ★★★★☆
Genre: 
Historical Fiction, Mystery
Page Count:
 233


A Story Not of Our Time

Stories set in our world and time are often of little interest to me. I can enjoy them, if the story is interesting enough, but I much prefer travelling to a time or place where I couldn’t possibly have lived.  

The medieval period is probably my favourite time period, with the Victorian Era a close second. 

A medieval mystery is an interesting combination, because often we associate mysteries with evidence, DNA samples, camera footage, etc. That isn’t possible when your greatest scientific advancement is a siege engine. 

When all those things are missing, logic and good old detective work takes hold.

The Fool’s Folly captures those two features well. Moray creates great characters that show their intelligence from the beginning, and the book explores it along the way. Their conclusions aren’t drawn out of nowhere, they make sense and you can follow them.


Politics at Play

A major issue that can easily arise when a book is set in medieval England is the politics. People could spend their whole life studying medieval England. The lord and ladies, the wars, the political game of chess.

It can be exhausting, and easily become hard to follow. 

The Fool’s Folly does suffer from this at times. It never becomes impossible to follow, but there are moments it becomes tough to understand everyone’s relationship to the story. 

Other than those few moments, the politics of the book aren’t a major plot line. The characters that are introduced are very few, and their positions in the world are easy to understand.


Left Unsatisfied

I wasn’t a fan of the way this story ended, but to be honest I can’t explain why. 

I enjoyed the characters well enough, the logic to come to the realization of who the killer was, was sound and made sense. The final scenes of the book weren’t out of place.

Thinking on it, I think I was left unsatisfied with who the killer ended up being. I enjoyed their justification, I just didn’t like how they left the people’s lives they were involved with. 


Final Thoughts

The Fool’s Folly is a short read, and if you enjoy mysteries, then you should pick it up. 

A short book like this won’t take much time to get through, but you’ll enjoy trying to solve the murder for yourself. 

The politics at play won’t disrupt the story for too long, but be aware that they can have an effect on your understanding. 

Quote of the Day: Hard Times

“However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. It is not so bad as you are. It looks poorest when you are richest. The fault-finder will find faults even in paradise. Love your life, poor as it is. You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poorhouse. The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man’s abode; the snow melts before its door as early in the spring. I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace.” 
― Henry David Thoreau, Walden

“You need to spend time crawling alone through shadows to truly appreciate what it is to stand in the sun.” 
― Shaun Hick

“Your friends will believe in your potential, your enemies will make you live up to it.” 
― Tim Fargo


“There had been times when he knew, somewhere in him, that he would get used to it, whatever it was, because he had learnt that some hard things became softer after a very little while.” 
― Nick Hornby, About a Boy

“And hard times are good in their own way, too. Because the only way you can achieve true happiness is if you experience true sadness as well. It’s all about light and shade. Balance.” 
― Gabrielle Williams, Beatle Meets Destiny

“Some people make a bad bed, they just have to lie in it.” 
― Virginia Euwer Wolff, Make Lemonade


“Regardless of the situation, don’t let the bastards win … and have no regrets … for it will be a good day!
― R.G. Risch, Beyond Mars: Crimson Fleet

“The way I see it, hard times aren’t only about money,
or drought,
or dust.
Hard times are about losing spirit,
and hope,
and what happens when dreams dry up.” 
― Karen Hesse, Out of the Dust

“It’s funny how, when things seem the darkest, moments of beauty present themselves in the most unexpected places.” 
― Karen Marie Moning, Dreamfever


“Why wait? So precious is this life—this gift—this temporary blindness. Burn and drown and embrace the false dark, then grasp the unthinkable height of resulting joy. For in the end, in the light of truth when the flesh is cast off, there is nothing but this.” 
― Jennifer DeLucy

“Don’t regret that your life is too easy, mine is rather easy too; I think that life is pretty long and that the time will arrive soon enough in which “another shall gird thee and carry thee where thou wouldst not.” 
― Vincent van Gogh, The Letters of Vincent van Gogh

“The most beautiful sunsets occur when the clouds try to prevent the sun from shining! Don’t forget that as you go through difficult times, the obstacles that appear lasting suddenly disappear and the sun comes out!” 
― Mehmet Murat ildan


“Hard times and fake friends are like oil and water : they don’t mix. 
― Nkwachukwu Ogbuagu

“In tough times will you whine or shine?” 
― Daren Martin

“I am not sure what you are going through. I don’t know the problem you are facing and I might not even understand, but I know that God won’t fail you and God will help you, trust in him. 
― De philosopher DJ Kyos


Blog Tour and Book Review: The Inheritance Games by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Title: The Inheritance Games
Author: Jennifer Lynn Barnes
Genre: Young Adult, Mystery, Thriller
Pages: 384
Rating: ★★★★☆

Avery Grambs has a plan for a better future: survive high school, win a scholarship, and get out. But her fortunes change in an instant when billionaire Tobias Hawthorne dies and leaves Avery virtually his entire fortune. The catch? Avery has no idea why–or even who Tobias Hawthorne is. To receive her inheritance, Avery must move into sprawling, secret passage-filled Hawthorne House, where every room bears the old man’s touch–and his love of puzzles, riddles, and codes. 

Unfortunately for Avery, Hawthorne House is also occupied by the family that Tobias Hawthorne just dispossessed. This includes the four Hawthorne grandsons: dangerous, magnetic, brilliant boys who grew up with every expectation that one day, they would inherit billions. Heir apparent Grayson Hawthorne is convinced that Avery must be a con-woman, and he’s determined to take her down. His brother, Jameson, views her as their grandfather’s last hurrah: a twisted riddle, a puzzle to be solved. Caught in a world of wealth and privilege, with danger around every turn, Avery will have to play the game herself just to survive.


A Thrill Ride from the Start

The Inheritance Games puts you in the action right from the start. You don’t have a chance to catch your breath because after a few pages something puts you right in the middle of the drama.

And the ride doesn’t slow down. There is intrigue and deception, red herrings and puzzles thrown at us left and right, there is hardly a chance to slow down.

Barnes jams a fun puzzle solving story into 384 pages, and it fits perfectly. Any less or any more, and the story would seem forced in either direction.

The characters push the plot forward and we never know who we can truly trust, and who is against the protagonist.


Well-Written Characters

The characters development in this book are some of the best I have seen in such a short piece. Too often, characters are either too developed where they become unbelievable, or they are underdeveloped where they are as interesting as a soda cracker.

We get introduced to just over a dozen different characters that are prominent in this story, and the only one we can trust completely is the protagonist.

The characters are often simply written, but that simplicity is explored to its fullest extent.

I wouldn’t say any of the characters are deeply explored, but each of them has an idea or personality that they embody, and Barnes develops them perfectly.

There are a handful of characters we should be able to trust in the story, but Barnes’ writing makes it so that we can’t trust anyone else in the story. This only adds to the tension that the story already had.


A Simple but Effective Mystery

I don’t often read mystery books, but when they are written well, they can be a lot of fun and thrilling.

Barnes’ gives us an escape room type mystery that takes place on the land of an impossibly large mansion.

With almost anything as a possibility in the mansion, The Inheritance Games follows the protagonist and a group of four brothers as they try to get in the mind of their now deceased grandfather.

A mystery doesn’t have to be world ending, or life saving. A mystery can be as simple as finding the answer to the final puzzle your grandfather gave to you.

Barnes takes that simple idea, and expands it into a simple but fun mystery. Her character’s story doesn’t save any lives, but to her, it’s everything. Her world is torn apart, and that means we are invested in what happens to her.


Final Thoughts

The Inheritance Games is fun and fast-paced read. You’ll be hooked by it from the start, and it will take you for a thrill ride right up until the end.

The ending of the book sets up a good sequel, and the reactions from people online point to a lot of excitement around the sequel when it comes out.