My Predictions for the Book World in the 2020s

Hello dear readers, I have a post that I’ve been wanting to write for a while for you today.

I was looking back at my childhood and remembering books and publishing from when I was a kid and how it has changed since then.

That got me thinking about what I think will happen in the next ~10 years in the publishing world.

These are just things that I think will happen. If I happen to be correct, then good for me, if I am not, then oh well.

What are your predictions for the book world? Do you agree or disagree with any of my predictions? Let’s talk about it in the comments, and make sure to follow me on social media!
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Physical Books

I don’t foresee any major change in this department. I think the printing of physical books has found a happy medium in terms of sales. There might be some spikes and some lows of people buying physical books, but it will more or less stay the same with maybe a small growth.

I find a lot of less serious readers prefer to have a physical book in their hands because they don’t see the need for an e-reader. A lot of book bloggers/tubers also seem to like getting their hands on physical books, though plenty like e-books too.


e-Books

I think the demand for e-books will continue to grow at a steady pace. It is becoming a much more affordable and portable way to read. If authors and publishers want to keep e-readers happy though, I think they will need to find ways to ensure more accessible files for their e-books, which brings me to my second point.

I think we will see more variety in types of e-readers. I think a few companies will develop their own version of a Kindle, with unique features specific to their brand, which will give readers cheaper options that might fit their needs/wants better. Two companies that I believe could pursue this path are Google and Microsoft, but also possibly an out of the blue small company that focuses solely on e-readers.


Audiobooks

Audiobooks will continue to grow and become more mainstream. Audiobook services will be easier to obtain for smaller authors, and audiobook narrators will be more sought after.

I think there will be more of a division between narrators though, with a small group of narrators being regularly sought after, and listeners will look for books by those specific narrators.

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Publishing

With the Black Lives Matter movement across the world, I expect to see better diversity in publishing. It’s not something that happens overnight, but I expect by 2025-7 we will see more equality between what peoples are being published. I expect there to be ups and downs, some being lower and higher based off of social upbringings, but for the most part we will see more equality.


Writing

I actually predict that writing will become less of a career path for many people. With the rise of technology and video games I think that young people won’t pursue writing as often since they won’t be reading as much.

What we will see a rise in is the number of non-white authors. I think as publishing better represents minorities, those minorities will see writing as a tangible career choice.


Adaptations

Already there are a lot of TV shows and movies that are based off of books and I think this will only continue to rise. The o only issue is that these companies too often re-make old content because they know it will make them money.

With more ideas coming from authors with a large variety of backgrounds, the entertainment industry will be forced to turn them into movies and TV shows.

I also think that books will start getting video game adaptations. I don’t see this becoming a regular habit until the late 2020s, but I think there is a lot of potential for really fun video-games that could become best-sellers if they are dated from books. Look at the Witcher Series for example.


Marketing

It’s tough to market books, there isn’t much you can do that would be new in my opinion. I think marketers will embrace certain styles of books, or books with certain voices and characters in them.


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Overall

I don’t see much of a change for the book world overall in the next 10 years except becoming more inclusive. We will see a change in stories and trends, but for the most part I don’t see things changing.

If I had to make one big guess, I would assume that the desire for YA content will be greater than ever. YA content is almost universally read so publishers will pursue it as a safe bet.


What are your predictions for the book world? Do you agree or disagree with any of my predictions? Let’s talk about it in the comments, and make sure to follow me on social media!
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AudioBook Review: Outlander

I have said before that it is a rare occurrence for a TV show or movie to be better than the book, but Outlander is one of those books that might just be an exception.

I had binge watched most of the TV show in a few weeks, knowing that there was a related book series, but I didn’t really feel like I had the time to start another series of books since I already had a few going at the time.

I had a free audio book that I could download, and I figured Outlander would be a good choice of book, and I am happy I was right.

Despite being a fantastic book, that the TV show is very similar to, I think an audiobook was a good call for Outlander, because the woman who was reading the story had a nice accent, and did a good job changing her voice slightly depending on who was speaking.

This is one of the few audiobooks I have listened to, but each one I listen to makes me love the medium more and more.


In terms of how the book actually was, I thought it was well written, very descriptive, and historically accurate (from my small understanding of that period in history).

I think when doing a historical fiction piece, it is important to get some level of accuracy, and I think Diana Gabaldon did a great job of writing about the period and the characters.

I haven’t read too many historical fiction pieces before, but I thought that I could really understand the period and the society that Gabaldon writes about in Outlander.

I haven’t learned a lot of this period in history, but I have done some research after watching the TV show, and from what I can tell Outlander is pretty spot on to what I could have expected.


Gabaldon’s writing style has caused her to quickly cracked my Top 10 favourite authors even though I only listened to one of her books.

I find her descriptive writing to be captivating enough that I can see myself in the story, but not overbearing that it becomes a grind getting through different scenes.

I think there is a time and place for overly descriptive writing. I think George R.R. Martin does a good job of it, but he is one of the few people that I have read that was able to do it well.

Gabaldon’s writing has enough description in it that there were times I could see the scene so perfectly, and the sex scenes were…interesting to say the least.


I think a historical-fiction book does its’ job when it makes the reader want to explore more. After listening to the entire book on my walks to and from work every day, I watched a few other shows about Scotland and their history. I also did some light reading online about Scotland and their fights for independence.

As you probably know, I am a lover of history, and Outlander has definitely made me want to dive a little deeper into the historical fiction genre.


I plan on continuing the series in the future, but not any time soon. There’s a few other series I want to finish first, but I won’t forget Outlander because I really enjoy the TV show.

Wednesday News: May 1

The audiobook and physical book “debate” has been around since audio books came around. Some people say only succesful people listen to audio books, others listen to it because of a physical impairment, or because they don’t have time to sit down and read a book.

How do you prefer to read your books?

James Tate Hill wrote a great article about audiobooks, and defends their use for “normal” people.

Audiobooks are not lesser versions of reading and are not only for “successful people.”

 

Wednesday News: Dec. 19

I havent come up with a catchy title for this one yet so I’m looking for some input.

I read this article last week and I thought it was really interesting.

I’ve never really gotten into audio books but I have listened to a few, but it was really interesting to see that audiobooks and normal reading are beneficial in different ways.

I think audio books can be really beenficial, and I never thought about how beneficial they can be for someone with dyslexia.

Do you listen to audio books? If so why? Let me know in the comments or shoot me an email. (also give me ideas for a catchy Wednesday News item headline please)