NetGalley eArc Review: The Seventh Perfection by Daniel Polansky

This is going to be a short review, because honestly I don’t have anything to say about this book other than why I didn’t like it.

I try to find the good in books, but this is probably the worst book I have ever read.


Title: The Seventh Perfection
Author: Daniel Polansky
Page Count: 176
Genre: Fantasy Novella
Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

When a woman with perfect memory sets out to solve a riddle, the threads she tugs on could bring a whole city crashing down. The God-King who made her is at risk, and his other servants will do anything to stop her.

To become the God-King’s Amanuensis, Manet had to master all seven perfections, developing her body and mind to the peak of human performance. She remembers everything that has happened to her, in absolute clarity, a gift that will surely drive her mad. But before she goes, Manet must unravel a secret which threatens not only the carefully prepared myths of the God-King’s ascent, but her own identity and the nature of truth itself.

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The Seventh Perfection was 176 pages of a waste of time. Throughout the entire story I didn’t figure out what the point of the story was, where it was going, or how any of the stories overlapped.

I had no idea what was happening at any point, I wasn’t even sure if our main character was male, female, or human half the time.

When I thought I understood what was happening, something would happen in the story and I would be more confused and lost than before.

I’ll give the author credit for writing a story in the second perspective. It’s a very rare situation, but honestly not sure it was worth it.

Maybe it was just me. Maybe I was the reason the story didn’t make sense, but I can honestly say the only thing that I liked from the book was the idea that people spent their lives learning these different “perfections” to serve the ruler.


I am sorry to disappoint everyone with this review. I don’t have the best luck for books I look out for on NetGalley, I seem to always be disappointed in them, but one day I will find one I enjoy!

Quote of the Day: Mysteries

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“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existence. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery each day.
― Albert Einstein

“Margo always loved mysteries. And in everything that came afterward, I could never stop thinking that maybe she loved mysteries so much that she became one.” 
― John Green, Paper Towns

“The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery.” 
― Anais Nin


“Stars, too, were time travelers. How many of those ancient points of light were the last echoes of suns now dead? How many had been born but their light not yet come this far? If all the suns but ours collapsed tonight, how many lifetimes would it take us to realize we were alone? I had always known the sky was full of mysteries—but not until now had I realized how full of them the earth was.” 
― Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

“Nothing whets the intelligence more than a passionate suspicion, nothing develops all the faculties of an immature mind more than a trail running away into the dark.” 
― Stefan Zweig, The Burning Secret and other stories

“The sweetest smiles hold the darkest secrets…” 
― Sara Shepard, Flawless


“Once there were brook trout in the streams in the mountains. You could see them standing in the amber current where the white edges of their fins wimpled softly in the flow. They smelled of moss in your hand. Polished and muscular and torsional. On their backs were vermiculate patterns that were maps of the world in its becoming. Maps and mazes. Of a thing which could not be put back. Not be made right again. In the deep glens where they lived all things were older than man and they hummed of mystery.” 
― Cormac McCarthy, The Road

“No, I would not want to live in a world without dragons, as I would not want to live in a world without magic, for that is a world without mystery, and that is a world without faith.” 
― R.A. Salvatore, Streams of Silver

“Well, good-bye for now,” he said, rolling his neck as if we hadn’t been talking about anything important at all. He bowed at the waist, those wings vanishing entirely, and had begun to fade into the nearest shadow when he went rigid.
His eyes locked on mine wide and wild, and his nostrils flared. Shock—pure shock flashed across his features at whatever he saw on my face, and he stumbled back a step. Actually stumbled. 
“What is—” I began.
He disappeared—simply disappeared, not a shadow in sight—into the crisp air.” 
― Sarah J. Maas, A Court of Thorns and Roses


“In my experience, boys are predictable. As soon as they think of something, they do it. Girls are smarter—they plan ahead. They think about not getting caught.” 
― Eoin Colfer, Half-Moon Investigations

“Every solution to every problem is simple. It’s the distance between the two where the mystery lies.” 
― Derek Landy, Skulduggery Pleasant

“Love is an endless mystery, because there is no reasonable cause that could explain it.” 
― Rabindranath Tagore


Book Review: The Fool’s Folly by Keith Moray

I received this book as an eARC from NetGalley in return for an honest review of it. 

I don’t often read mystery, but when I do, I enjoy the thrill of it.

Mystery novels can have an unsatisfying end, which ruins the entirety of the book, and mystery novels can have characters jump to some wild conclusions for the sake of wrapping up all the loose ends. 

It is a tough line to walk, making the character learn enough to solve all the clues, but when done well it makes the story much better.

If you enjoy this review, make sure to follow me on social media for more content.

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Trust no one…

1485, Yorkshire, England

King Richard III has held the English throne for two years. But the country is rife with rumours about the fate of his nephews, the two princes imprisoned in the Tower of London, and there is a continual threat of rebellion by Henry Tudor.

King Richard’s heir, John de la Pole, presides over the stronghold of Sandal Castle. When a suspicious death occurs in his household, he instructs Sir Giles Beeston, the newly appointed judge, to the Manor Court to investigate.

But before Sir Giles can get to the bottom of the murder, more grisly deaths occur.

Are the deaths connected? Is there a plot against the King?

And can Sir Giles unmask the killer before he too falls victim to the killer…?

Title: The Fool’s Folly 
Author: Keith Moray
Rating: ★★★★☆
Genre: 
Historical Fiction, Mystery
Page Count:
 233


A Story Not of Our Time

Stories set in our world and time are often of little interest to me. I can enjoy them, if the story is interesting enough, but I much prefer travelling to a time or place where I couldn’t possibly have lived.  

The medieval period is probably my favourite time period, with the Victorian Era a close second. 

A medieval mystery is an interesting combination, because often we associate mysteries with evidence, DNA samples, camera footage, etc. That isn’t possible when your greatest scientific advancement is a siege engine. 

When all those things are missing, logic and good old detective work takes hold.

The Fool’s Folly captures those two features well. Moray creates great characters that show their intelligence from the beginning, and the book explores it along the way. Their conclusions aren’t drawn out of nowhere, they make sense and you can follow them.


Politics at Play

A major issue that can easily arise when a book is set in medieval England is the politics. People could spend their whole life studying medieval England. The lord and ladies, the wars, the political game of chess.

It can be exhausting, and easily become hard to follow. 

The Fool’s Folly does suffer from this at times. It never becomes impossible to follow, but there are moments it becomes tough to understand everyone’s relationship to the story. 

Other than those few moments, the politics of the book aren’t a major plot line. The characters that are introduced are very few, and their positions in the world are easy to understand.


Left Unsatisfied

I wasn’t a fan of the way this story ended, but to be honest I can’t explain why. 

I enjoyed the characters well enough, the logic to come to the realization of who the killer was, was sound and made sense. The final scenes of the book weren’t out of place.

Thinking on it, I think I was left unsatisfied with who the killer ended up being. I enjoyed their justification, I just didn’t like how they left the people’s lives they were involved with. 


Final Thoughts

The Fool’s Folly is a short read, and if you enjoy mysteries, then you should pick it up. 

A short book like this won’t take much time to get through, but you’ll enjoy trying to solve the murder for yourself. 

The politics at play won’t disrupt the story for too long, but be aware that they can have an effect on your understanding. 

Blog Tour and Book Review: The Inheritance Games by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Title: The Inheritance Games
Author: Jennifer Lynn Barnes
Genre: Young Adult, Mystery, Thriller
Pages: 384
Rating: ★★★★☆

Avery Grambs has a plan for a better future: survive high school, win a scholarship, and get out. But her fortunes change in an instant when billionaire Tobias Hawthorne dies and leaves Avery virtually his entire fortune. The catch? Avery has no idea why–or even who Tobias Hawthorne is. To receive her inheritance, Avery must move into sprawling, secret passage-filled Hawthorne House, where every room bears the old man’s touch–and his love of puzzles, riddles, and codes. 

Unfortunately for Avery, Hawthorne House is also occupied by the family that Tobias Hawthorne just dispossessed. This includes the four Hawthorne grandsons: dangerous, magnetic, brilliant boys who grew up with every expectation that one day, they would inherit billions. Heir apparent Grayson Hawthorne is convinced that Avery must be a con-woman, and he’s determined to take her down. His brother, Jameson, views her as their grandfather’s last hurrah: a twisted riddle, a puzzle to be solved. Caught in a world of wealth and privilege, with danger around every turn, Avery will have to play the game herself just to survive.


A Thrill Ride from the Start

The Inheritance Games puts you in the action right from the start. You don’t have a chance to catch your breath because after a few pages something puts you right in the middle of the drama.

And the ride doesn’t slow down. There is intrigue and deception, red herrings and puzzles thrown at us left and right, there is hardly a chance to slow down.

Barnes jams a fun puzzle solving story into 384 pages, and it fits perfectly. Any less or any more, and the story would seem forced in either direction.

The characters push the plot forward and we never know who we can truly trust, and who is against the protagonist.


Well-Written Characters

The characters development in this book are some of the best I have seen in such a short piece. Too often, characters are either too developed where they become unbelievable, or they are underdeveloped where they are as interesting as a soda cracker.

We get introduced to just over a dozen different characters that are prominent in this story, and the only one we can trust completely is the protagonist.

The characters are often simply written, but that simplicity is explored to its fullest extent.

I wouldn’t say any of the characters are deeply explored, but each of them has an idea or personality that they embody, and Barnes develops them perfectly.

There are a handful of characters we should be able to trust in the story, but Barnes’ writing makes it so that we can’t trust anyone else in the story. This only adds to the tension that the story already had.


A Simple but Effective Mystery

I don’t often read mystery books, but when they are written well, they can be a lot of fun and thrilling.

Barnes’ gives us an escape room type mystery that takes place on the land of an impossibly large mansion.

With almost anything as a possibility in the mansion, The Inheritance Games follows the protagonist and a group of four brothers as they try to get in the mind of their now deceased grandfather.

A mystery doesn’t have to be world ending, or life saving. A mystery can be as simple as finding the answer to the final puzzle your grandfather gave to you.

Barnes takes that simple idea, and expands it into a simple but fun mystery. Her character’s story doesn’t save any lives, but to her, it’s everything. Her world is torn apart, and that means we are invested in what happens to her.


Final Thoughts

The Inheritance Games is fun and fast-paced read. You’ll be hooked by it from the start, and it will take you for a thrill ride right up until the end.

The ending of the book sets up a good sequel, and the reactions from people online point to a lot of excitement around the sequel when it comes out.

March Madness (2)

Hello again dear readers. You are only a day and a bit away from the weekend! Just don’t forget to enjoy the moment while you’re looking to the horizon.

If you missed last week’s March Madness post, you should probably go check it out here.

To simplify it for you, I want to hold a March Madness tournament, but for books.

I narrowed the books down into four more popular categories, each having 16 books.

I decided on these genres and these books doing some pretty thorough research into popular books in each genre.

I will make a post about the rules for this, and what will be happening during March a few weeks before it goes live, but you can check out the list of books in each genre down below.


These are the 16 Books in each of the four categories:

Horror

  1. Rosemary’s Baby
  2. The Haunting of Hill House
  3. The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories
  4. Carrie
  5. Dracula
  6. Frankenstein
  7. Pet Semetary
  8. The Shining
  9. Let the Right One In
  10. Gothic Tales
  11. The Exorcist
  12. Interview with the Vampire
  13. Ring
  14. The Turn of the Screw
  15. The Woman in Black
  16. The Tell-Tale Heart

Mystery

  1. The Maltese Falcon
  2. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
  3. Gone Girl
  4. In Cold Blood
  5. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
  6. The Hounds of Baskerville
  7. The Girl on the Train
  8. Rebecca
  9. The Firm
  10. Murder on the Orient Express
  11. Davinci Code
  12. And Then There Were None
  13. The Godfather
  14. The Alienist
  15. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
  16. A is for Alibi

Fantasy

  1. The Lord of the Rings
  2. Game of Thrones
  3. Assassin’s Apprentice
  4. The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe
  5. The Lies of Locke Lamora
  6. The Name of the Wind
  7. The Eye of the World
  8. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  9. Malazan Book of the Fallen
  10. American Gods
  11. Mistborn
  12. Wizard’s First Rule
  13. The Golden Compass
  14. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
  15. Outlander
  16. Eragon

Science Fiction

  1. Dune
  2. 1984
  3. Ender’s Game
  4. Brave New World
  5. Starship Troopers
  6. Fahrenheit 451
  7. The Handmaid’s Tale
  8. The War of the Worlds
  9. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
  10. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  11. Star Wars
  12. Slaughterhouse-Five
  13. Watchmen
  14. The Martian
  15. The Hunger Games
  16. A Wrinkle in Time

If you like the idea of this March Madness for books, please follow the blog, or find me on social media!
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Book Review: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

1618

Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. And he detests the color yellow.

Although gifted with a superbly logical brain, for fifteen-year-old Christopher everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning. He lives on patterns, rules, and a diagram kept in his pocket. Then one day, a neighbor’s dog, Wellington, is killed and his carefully constructive universe is threatened. Christopher sets out to solve the murder in the style of his favourite (logical) detective, Sherlock Holmes. What follows makes for a novel that is funny, poignant and fascinating in its portrayal of a person whose curse and blessing are a mind that perceives the world entirely literally.

Author: Mark Haddon

Rating: 3/5

Honestly it took me a while to figure out what to say about this book. I read it a few years ago, and  it only took me a few days, but I didn’t feel satisfied with it when I was done.

I enjoyed the beginning of the book, and was pretty sold on it being a good book until the end. I don’t really have a specific reason for it, but I just didn’t really like the ending that much. I guess i was unsatisfied with it.

The book has a really interesting concept, and I’ve never read a book that was from the persepctive of someone with a behavioral disorder. Despite that, I thought it did a really good job.

My whole life I’ve interacted with people that have Autism or Aspergers, so I’ve had some experience with those, and I thought this book did a really good job of putting the reader into the mind of someone with a behavioral disorder.

The book follows Christopher, a 15-year-old boy with an unspecified behavioral disorder as he investigates the killing of his neighbour’s dog, despite his father telling him to stay out of other people’s business.

It’s a bit of a mystery novel, but at the same time we get to see Christopher’s life and how he interacts with the world around him.

Seeing the world through the eyes of someone with a  behavioral disorder isn’t something I’d ever thought about really, but that was one aspect of the book that I really enjoyed.

I’d really enjoy reading another book like this, but I understand that it can be a bit of a slippery slope if the author isn’t careful about how they portray their character.

Next week I’m gonna take a look at a book about a man and his monsterous other half.

Since it’s New Years I want to hear what everyone’s New Year’s Resolutions are. If I get 5 I’ll make a tweet about what mine is.

Channel Update

Alright so I originally started this blog as a school assignment but I really started to like it and spent some free time during the term figuring out whether or not I should take the blog full time, and how I would be able to do that.

Well good news is I figured out how I can do both of those. I’ve got new ideas for the blog and plan on updating it every day, but I’m not guarenteeing anything with school going on.

So here is the updated schedule of what the posts will look like:

Monday: Book Review

Tuesday: Type it Out Tuesdays (post different writing prompts for people     interested in writing themselves)

Wednesday: Book related news (books being adapted to movies/tv shows, new books coming out, etc.)

Thursday: Thursday Thoughts (different thoughts I have on book related things ex. My Top 10s, Book related life stories, seasonal book topics, writing challenges etc.)

Friday: Quote of the Day (from the book I reviewed that week)

Saturday/Sunday: Taking a break to relax

I also have some channel updates coming out too. I want to update the books I’ve read/want to read  and throw in alphabetical shortcuts so it’s easier to find the author.

I’m also gonna make a Facebook group book club so theres an easier platform for more people to chat about a book. The book club will be one book a month to start instead of every week.

I’m also going to update some pictures and minor pages on the blog itself.

I hope everyone is as excited as I am for this update.