Book Tour & Review: Of Myth and Shadow by Matthew S. Cox

Before I begin, I just want to thank Blackthorn Book Tours and Matthew S. Cox for giving me a copy of this book to give an honest review for.

If you like this review, please follow me on social media for more. I post bookish content and I will be coming out with some marketing focused material starting this week.
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 


Title: Of Myth and Shadow
Author: Matthew S. Cox
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Page Count: 1,482
Rating: ★★★★☆

Aegaan is a vast and righteous kingdom, yet darkness gathers in the distant corners of the realm. Elven raids on small towns have inflamed racial tensions with humans, pushing distrust to hatred and the brink of war.

Anrael wanders the woods alone until a chance meeting tempts him to set aside his contempt for those who scorn his half-elven blood.

When Kylie, a naive elf terrified of humans, is thrust among them against her will, she begins to question her mother’s tales of dread.

Having lost everything dear to him, the bandit king Jhelan lives only to seek challenge in battle… until he finds himself willing to die protecting that which he hates the most.

The diabolical mystique of the dark elves cloaks L’an Thal’Sara in protection, but the cruelest lie she tells is to herself.

Thaelwyn, a virtuous knight, sets out to discover the source of the Elves’ aggression, but faces a much greater test within his mind.

Beneath the chaos, minions of the Destroyer search for their promised leader, a child possessing power beyond their years. If the innocent falls to darkness, a kingdom rife with hatred will surely crumble.

Advertisements

World Building to the Extreme

In my opinion, creating a world so well-written that even just scratching the surface of it can help you explore every inch of it is one of the tests of a great author.

It would be easy for a lot of authors to create a contained world and have the characters’ interactions as the main story driven device.

There’s nothing wrong with that, and there’s nothing wrong with authors who pursue that route. They are still brilliant and I love their works, but my favorite thing about books is the world I can immerse myself in.

Cox creates a beautiful world full of magical creatures. I wouldn’t say it is as well defined as Game of Thrones or similar works, but it doesn’t need to be. In Of Myth and Shadow we only scrape the surface of the realm. We know there are peoples, creatures, and places we have yet to explore, but their effects change the course of the story even when they aren’t present.

Cox has a great ability to write fantastical worlds within the first few pages of his stories, and his characters feel natural. They’re not forced or overly dramatic for the sake of the story.


A Story of Current Events

Telling a fantasy story that touches on current political and social events isn’t easy. The difference in worlds can make it difficult to properly portray the issues we see in our world.

Though it isn’t perfect, I think Cox does a good job about touching on racial issues we are seeing in our world today.

Again it’s not perfect, and you have to make some assumptions to translate it into more “modern” terms, but the fantasy world’s version can teach you some lessons if you are willing to educate yourself.


A Good End

It’s not often that I enjoy the ending of a book. I am too often disappointed or unfulfilled, that I think I have become calloused to the idea of a good ending.

Though it’s not perfect, I think Cox’s ending was just about where I wanted it to be. It wasn’t perfect, but it felt natural. None of the character storylines felt forced, out of place, or unrealistic.

Each ending felt like it was something that would have happened to them, and that is too often missed.

I am glad Cox took the time to know where his character’s stories were going, and giving them the endings that they deserved.


Final Thoughts

I’ve only recently discovered Cox, from a previous review of his book; The Girl Who Found the Sun. I’ve come to like his style of writing and his quick paced storytelling.

Of Myth and Shadow is a great Epic Fantasy novel with a lot of fun characters.

Cox does a great job of writing smart, funny characters, and I really like the young children he writes because they are often too smart for their own good, but at the same time very believable.


If you enjoyed Of Myth and Shadow, or any of my other content, make sure to follow me on social media!
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 

Short Book Synopsis: Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson

Hello dear readers, welcome to another Short Book Synopsis. It’s a simple idea: I summarize books for you so if you want to know what happens in them, you don’t need to worry about re-reading the entire book.

If you have any books you’d like me to cover, please let me know in the comments. Some I can do off the top of my head, where others will take a bit of research.

Also, make sure to follow me on social media!
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 


Advertisements

Shallan is the main focus in this book, and we get her flashbacks featured at times throughout the book. The flashbacks slowly reveal the gradual destruction of her family, and the details of her two potential murderous and/or abusive parents.

The Interludes introduce Lift and follow Eshonai as she, at first, reluctantly changes to stormform and then stages a coup, taking complete control of the Parshendi.


We start the prologue with Galivar’s assassination told from Jasnah’s perspective. We see the horror she witnesses and her bond and eventually Soulcast for the first time.


The main story starts with Shallan and Jasnah traveling by ship to the Shattered Plains. Jasnah tells Shallan of Shallan’s betrothal to her cousin Adolin. Shallan continues her teachings until she is woken during the middle of the night and witnessed the murder of Jasnah.

In an attempt to save the rest of the crew, Shallan soulcasts and causes the ship to sink.

She makes it to shore but is unable to soulcast a simple stick when she tries. She eventually joins Tvlakv’s slave wagons and heads towards the Shattered Plains.

Meanwhile, Kaladin sets up training exercises for other bridge crews and begins experimenting with his newfound Adhesion abilities. He gets upset when he finds out that Brightlord Amaran arrives in Dalinar’s camp.

Dalinar keeps trying to unite the Highprinces by using his authority as the new Highprince of War. In one of his flashbacks he and other Knight’s Radiant fight against a Thunderclast in the middle of a Highstorm.


Back to Shallan, she eventually joins Tyn’s caravan and joins with them to defend against bandits and winning over a group of deserters that were chasing them.

Tyn assumes she can’t really be who she says she is, so Tyn takes her on as an apprentice con artist. She eventually finds out the truth, but is killed by Shallan using her Shardblade.

Tyn assumes she can’t really be who she says she is, so Tyn takes her on as an apprentice con artist. She eventually finds out the truth, but is killed by Shallan using her Shardblade.

Adolin starts winning some duels and obtaining pieces of shard plate, following his father’s plan to unite the high princes. Renarin trains with Shardblade and plate while Torol Sadeas works against Dalinar, consolidating power and sending troops on gemstone raids when it is not his turn.

Szeth attempts to kill Dalinar, but Kaladin defends him. Kaladin tells Szeth he is a Windrunner just like him, but Szeth flees in confusion and anger.


Shallan finally arrives at the Shattered Plains in the middle of a conference between the King and the Highprinces. She informs the royal family of Jasnah’s death and cons her way into being hired by Seberial. Using her Lighweaving skills, she takes on the persona of “Veil” and does some work for the Ghostbloods. She uses them in an attempt to learn about Urithiru and warn Dalinar of the Parshendi Voidbringers.

During the day she manages Sebarial’s books and courts Adolin, who she begins hitting it off with.

Kaladin continues training the bridegemen, promoting more men capable of command so he can delegate more patrols and guard duty.

He attempts training like Szeth to walk on chasm walls, but instead flies high above the ground in control of his abilities.

Moash reveals his dark secret and out to kill the King. Kaladin is torn – he knows the king is week and should be killed, but he has sworn to protect him.

Adolin makes a mistake, and accidentally challenges four Shardbearers at once to a duel. With Kaladin’s help, Adolin manages to win the duel and Kaladin asks for a boon from the king; a challenge with Prince Amaran, but he is arrested at his declaration.


Kaladin stews in prison and is visited by Wit, who ends up making things worse. When he is eventually released, Kaladin learns that Adolin demanded to be imprisoned as long as he was, which softens Kaladin’s feelings towards Adolin and lighteyes in general.

An assassination attempt on Dalinar during a scouting mission leaves Kaladin and Shallan at the bottom of the chasms, but both used stormlight to survive the impossible fall. They both don’t trust each other at first, but they both lighten up and share some of their pasts with each other. Kaladin kills a chasm fiend with Shallan’s shardblade but then realizes he has lost all contact with Syl because he is involved in Moash’s scheme to kill the King.

The countdown clock ticks towards zero. Dalinar prepares an assault against the Parshendi. Kaladin and Shallan make it back to camp and Shallan insists on going on the assault, having mapped out a good amount of the Shattered Plains in her trip with Kaladin, who stays behind with a wound to his leg.


Dalinar leads his army, guided by Shallan, to the centre of the Shattered Plains to end the war once and for all. Kaladin falls into a deep depression over his loss of Syl and his injuries, before having an epiphany that he must protect the incompetent king from assassination.

He confronts Moash and almost dies before uttering the words:

I will protect even those I hate so long as it is right. 

When he speaks these words, Syl returns and becomes his shardblade once again. He fights off Moash and Graves who flee after failing to kill the King.

Dalinar and the Alethi army encounter the Parshendi, who have taken on a strange new form. A portion of them fight while a portion of them sing a strange, foreboding song. The Alethi manage to win, but not in time to stop the Everstorm from coming at the same exact time as a Highstorm.

Szeth arrives at the scene of the battle to finish the job on Dalinar, but Kaladin intervenes and stops Szeth, driving him away.

Shallan solves the age-old puzzle and finds the portal. She activates it using her shardblade and the Alethi are transported to Urithiru, making it through the Highstorm and Everstorm.

Dalinar, Shallan, Kaladin, and Renarin gather in Urithiru and declare themselves as Knights Radiant.


Did I miss anything? What were your favourite parts of Words of Radiance? Let’s talk about it in the comments.
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 

Book Review: The Way of Kings

Hello dear readers, I have technically reviewed this book before on my blog, but I did the entire series in one review.

Now that the fourth book in the series; Rhythm of War (order through the link), is coming out in the fall, I knew I had to give each book the proper review it deserved.

Because of that, it’s time to review the first book in the series, The Way of Kings. I hope you enjoy because this book series is in my top three of all time.

Title: The Way of Kings
Author: Brandon Sanderson
Rating: ★★★★.5☆
Buy: The Way of Kings
Pre-order: Rhythm of War

According to mythology mankind used to live in The Tranquiline Halls. Heaven. But then the Voidbringers assaulted and captured heaven, casting out God and men. Men took root on Roshar, the world of storms. And the Voidbringers followed…

They came against man ten thousand times. To help them cope, the Almighty gave men powerful suits of armor and mystical weapons, known as Shardblades. Led by ten angelic Heralds and ten orders of knights known as Radiants, mankind finally won.

Or so the legends say. Today, the only remnants of those supposed battles are the Shardblades, the possession of which makes a man nearly invincible on the battlefield. The entire world is at war with itself – and has been for centuries since the Radiants turned against mankind. Kings strive to win more Shardblades, each secretly wishing to be the one who will finally unite all of mankind under a single throne.

On a world scoured down to the rock by terrifying hurricanes that blow through every few day a young spearman forced into the army of a Shardbearer, led to war against an enemy he doesn’t understand and doesn’t really want to fight.

What happened deep in mankind’s past?

Why did the Radiants turn against mankind, and what happened to the magic they used to wield?


Advertisements

Sanderson Magic System

It’s no surprise that Brandon Sanderson is my favourite author. I love the way he can craft such beautiful worlds based off of a simple thing like a magic system.

I would say that The Way of King’s is the best of his magic systems. Not only does it affect how some of the heroes fight, which magic systems are almost always used for, but it also affects the important details of the world; money, light sources, societal class, and scientific advancement.

I love a well developed magic system when all it does is allow characters to fight, but when it literally runs the way the world works, it becomes so much more interesting.

What’s the most beautiful about this magic system is that it is simple. Yes it can be built upon and developed the more we learn about the story, but the core principles of it are as simple as 1 + 1.


A Fraction of the World

I love exploring new worlds in books. It’s one of the reasons I love reading so much.

A lot, if not all, stories have a sliver of our world in them. That might be an inspiration of a name, a location, or even an event.

There’s plenty of that in The Way of Kings, and that’s why I love it. There’s class issues, slavery, issues related to the death and punishment, women’s place in the world, and plenty more.

The fact that a story can deal with issues like that while telling an epic tale amazes me.

What’s even more wonderful is that we are only discovering a fraction of the world. We get MAYBE a tenth of the entire story, and so much is left as a mystery to us.


Advertisements

Mental Health is Important

Maybe I read a very narrow scope of books that don’t talk about mental health issues (other than books specifically about it).

It’s not an issue that is common in the books I read, but The Way of Kings touched it in a nice subtle way. It doesn’t outright state that one of the main characters has any mental health issues, but you see it in the way he interacts with the world and how his mind sees everything he does.

I don’t think there’s a perfect way to tell those stories, because it is a different experience for everyone. What is important is getting the idea out there, so that other people know that it is normal, even if it isn’t the same experience that they have.


Final Thoughts

The only thing I didn’t like about The Way of Kings was that I had a bit of a hard time following along at first. It had moments later on where I literally jumped out of my seat when I was reading, but it took me a while to understand the story.

Because of that, it took me a while to really commit myself to reading it, but when I did I was hooked.


What did you think of The Way of Kings?? If you love epic fantasy it needs to be on your TBR radar. The series just continues to get better. Make sure to follow me on social media for more book reviews!
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 

Book Review: Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

Title: The Priory of the Orange Tree
Author: Samantha Shannon
Rating: ★★★★.5☆

Buy it here.


Hello dear readers, I am excited about today’s review. I had bought Priory a few years ago after it was blowing up all over Twitter, but I kind of forgot about it for a while.

I never really knew anything about it. I knew it had dragons and magic, but that was it.

I am angry at myself for not getting to this book sooner, because it is one of my favourite standalone books of all time!

I’m a sucker for a book series, but its not often that I find a book on its own that I love this much.

If you like this review, please follow me on social media for more!
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 


Advertisements

The Worldbuilding

I will admit right off the hop the only reason this book did not receive a 5 out of 5 is because the world building left me quite confused at times.

I think Shannon did a brilliant job of creating a diverse world, with so many cultures, peoples, and customs. Some of my favourite characters in fiction come from this book, but I found it a bit tough to follow at the beginning because of it all.

There was so much history, so many character names, so many stories that I found it hard to get a grasp of it all.

Once I put the pieces of the puzzle together and started remembering the names, the relationships, and the stories, it all started coming together.

I thought Shannon built a beautiful and diverse world in Priory, and it was just the surface. We get to see several places where there is nothing but a mere chapter of information.

The world of the Priory is definitely one I would want to dive into again.


The Romance

There isn’t much romance in the beginning of the book. There is marriage and rumors of a love affair, but it doesn’t come across as romance to me.

The romance comes in the second half of the book, in two same-sex relationships.

I will admit that this is the first book I have read where there were same-sex relationships, and I think I picked a good place to start.

The romance doesn’t happen in an instant. It doesn’t even happen after a few chapters. The romance happens over chapters and chapters, between characters that I didn’t think would fall in love.

It felt so natural though. Shannon does a perfect job of taking two characters and making them fall in love. First with the small moments in life, until bigger and bigger moments occur.

It is a true fantasy love story and the realest romance of any book couples that come to mind.


Advertisements

The Characters’ Change

Almost every single one of the main characters are tested throughout Priory. Whether its their beliefs, their physical capabilities, or their wits, they are tested again and again.

Too often characters from books stay the same. They don’t change throughout their stories, or they change in ways that don’t make sense. Priory is different than that.

Priory allows the characters to grow from their experiences. Shannon writes characters that adapt based off of their circumstance, and turn into smarter, better, stronger people.

They change in believable ways, whether in an instant, or more slowly.

Shannon does a lot well with Priory, but this was one of the best aspects of the story.


The Magic

Magic is both important and hidden in the background in this story. It is a secret art that is looked down upon.

Though dragons are real, and the bonds between them are common, the use of magic itself is very limited.

Even when it is used, we don’t get much of an explanation of it. There are no hard set rules, but it is explained well enough that we understand what can be done.


The Final Thoughts

I love The Priory of the Orange Tree. I love the world, the characters, and I love Shannon’s writing style.

I don’t often come across books that seem to capture the human essence so well, and because of it I have gotten a hold of the rest of the books by Shannon.


What did you think of The Priory of the Orange Tree? Let’s talk about it in the comments, and make sure to follow me on social media.

Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 

10 Reasons I Love High Fantasy Books

Hello dear readers, welcome back to another Top Ten Tuesday put on by the Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is 10 Reasons I Love [Insert Topic]. Right away I knew what I wanted to talk about; High Fantasy. It is by far my favourite genre, and there are definitely more than 10 reasons why I love it.

If you have any reasons why you love High Fantasy Books, please add them to the list. I always like reading other peoples’ reasons for loving fantasy.
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 


Advertisements

Travel to Impossible Worlds

With high fantasy, we aren’t limited to our world, or some near identical variant of it. We go to Middle Earth, Westeros, or wherever the words take us. We get to escape the reality that is our lives because there is so little in common with our lives and the lives of those trying to destroy their enemies using magic.


The Stakes are High

High Fantasy gives us impossible odds. We aren’t trying to take down a gang member, escape this monster, or fall in love with the girl next door. With High Fantasy the goal is often to destroy a near god like figure. Something that powerful can only be defeated with great sacrifice and risk, and we go along for the ride.


Magic Systems

What is High Fantasy without world destroying magic? It’s part of the experience. We often get to explore the magic system alongside one of our main characters. What makes the magic system even more amazing is that they are so unique. Each high fantasy series has an aspect to it that makes it different from the rest and stand out.


Worldbuilding

This is my favourite aspect of High Fantasy. It’s like taking a history lesson of the book series. We get events that happened years before the books take place, we get character backstories, we get future books explaining the entire world.

The possibilities are near endless, and when an author does a good job at creating a world, magical things can happen.


Advertisements

Spans over Several Books

When I read a book, there are too many times when I want more. I want to follow the characters more, I want to watch them grow. That’s only possible to do (properly) over several books. I want to dedicate days and weeks to one series. I want to immerse myself in the world over and over, not just over one book.

25 of the Best Fantasy Books You Should Read Next - James T Kelly ...

We Learn Who the Characters Are

High Fantasy often brings readers a lot of different character. They all have different backstories, different experiences and different goals. When we get to step into their mind and explore their thoughts and fears. It helps me connect to the characters and put myself into the story.


The Stories stick with you

When you follow a story or a character for several books, you can’t help but keep it with you. It becomes a part of who you are and what stories you like. It influences the way you feel about other books and how you connect with them.


“Fiction is the lie through which we tell the truth.” ― Albert Camus

A quote that becomes more and more true the more High Fantasy I read. With High Fantasy, we get to explore fantasy worlds that have no similarities with our own world. Despite that, we can explore human issues in a different light. We can explore and learn about things from the perspective of the victims and the accusers and hopefully come to a better understanding of the issue in our own lives.

Advertisements
Recommend a high fantasy book

I want the happy ending

It’s not guaranteed, but more often than not, we get the heroes defeating the villain. It often comes with losses and hardship along the way, but the after books and books of struggling, the moment the heroes finally succeed feels amazing. It makes the struggle more than worth it.


Possibility for awesome memorabilia

I think the memorabilia world is bombarded with only a few fantasy series, mainly Game of Thrones and Harry Potter, and it sucks because there are so many opportunities for amazing TV shows, t shirts, and dozens of other things.


If you have any reasons why you love High Fantasy Books, please add them to the list. I always like reading other peoples’ reasons for loving fantasy.
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 

Sabran IX Berethnet: A Queen of Legacy

Hello my dear readers. After many weeks of putting it down to finish other books, I finally finished The Priory of the Orange Tree.

This isn’t a review of the book, that will come some time in the future, hopefully soon. Instead, I want to analyze one of the main characters that stuck out to me during the book; Sabran IX, the ruler of the Queendom of Inys.

Some of these opinions might be seen as controversial, and if you agree or disagree with me, we should talk about it in the comments, or send me a message on social media.
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 


Advertisements

She’s Flawed

My favourite thing about Sabran is that she is far from perfect and confident. She is very much a flawed character, and that is what makes her story so much more interesting.

She is a young Queen, but a strong ruler.

She has her fears about having children, and pursues immortality instead. She has fears that plenty of young women have.

Childbirth can be a scary thing for anybody, even a queen. If the power of immortality was at your fingertips, wouldn’t you think of pursuing it too?

Samantha Shannon, author of The Priory of the Orange Tree

She’s Conflicted

Sabran has lived her entire life with other voices in her head, making decisions for her. She is the Queen, but she’s had advisors and other nobles limiting her freedom of thought.

Because of this, we see her doubt. We see her unsure of herself when she has a moment of privacy that the reader gets to explore. On the surface, she is a strong, more than capable queen. When we can tear wear the tough exterior, she is scared, she is unsure, she is exhausted.

It can’t be easy being a Queen, and when you’ve had a parentless existence like she has, you can imagine how lonely it can be.


Advertisements

She’s Romantic

Marriage is one thing Sabran tried to avoid when she was young. She didn’t want to marry, she wanted to be immortal instead.

When love finally comes her way, it’s as if she dives into it head first. She opens herself up to it, and she enjoys it. All of her fears are put to the side, and she accepts the beautiful things that love can bring.

That’s when her world is torn apart.

Sabran finally accepts love. She realizes the good it can bring, and how happy it can make her, and then it is ripped from her.

Her husband and her child are taken from her. The two things she was terrified to go through with were torn from her, her fears come true.

The emotional and mental destruction that would bring on anyone. She spent years avoiding them, and it is almost as if her fears made it a reality.

When Sabran realizes her feelings for Ead, it’s as if her pieces are put back together, slowly, but much stronger.

Cover from Goodreads

She allows herself to feel again, despite all the pain and fear it has brought her.

This time, she finds the love of her life. She finds her other half, and even when she falls into more emotional moments, where Ead is in danger, she keeps a strong head and does what needs to be done.

She may love Ead, but she knows when she needs to be a lover and when she needs to be a fighter.


She’s Strong

It’s never directly stated, but it seems like Sabran’s ancestors have always suffered from depressive episodes.

It’s fairly well known, and Sabran experiences a few throughout the book.

What I like about her, is that she comes back from these dark moments, and she steps up when the time is right.

A thousand years of “destiny” and “prophecy” are on Sabran’s shoulders. She believes she is the sole reason that the end of the world is alive. She believes if her lineage ends, the Nameless One will rise and destroy the world.

When a High Welters, the strongest of the dragons besides the Nameless One, comes to her doorstep, she doesn’t hesitate in confronting it. She knows she could die with one swipe of its tail, but she confronts it as if she could kill it with her gaze alone.


She’s Wise

As we make it further into The Priory of the Orange Tree, the entirety of Sabran’s religion is tested more than once.

The truth to the origin story of her religion is proven wrong, and then wrong again.

Despite this, she is understanding, and she is open minded. She could remain ignorant, sticking to her beliefs of what her and her people have been taught for hundreds of years.

It would be the easiest thing for her to do, but she is willing to accept the truth to it all, and learn from it.

Fan art of Sabran IX from the PotOT Wiki

Advertisements

Sabran’s character is far from perfect. She’s a bit of a bitch at times during the start of the book, but as we get to know her more and more, we understand why.

We understand her thoughts and actions more and more, and we realize she is an amazing character.

Sabran is definitely my favorite part of The Priory of the Orange Tree. She provides a wonderful emotional thread to the story, and it’s always refreshing to have a character that acts with her mind and heart, instead of just her heart.

Fan art of Sabran IX from the PotOT Wiki

What did you think of Sabran IX? I’d love to talk about her, or this book in the comments, or on social media.
Twitter  | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook 

Mistborn Review: A Hero’s Struggle

My Rating:  ★★★ ★ ☆

Author: Brandon Sanderson

Before I opened this book I wasn’t too sure about whether I’d like it. I love Brandon Sanderson and all the books of his that I have read so far have been amazing, but I read a few iffy reviews of Mistborn and was a bit nervous.

Those nerves quickly subsided when I started reading it though, cause I was hooked by the end of the first few chapters.

What really got me interested, which isn’t usually something I find in books, is that the entire plot of the book was laid out very early on.

The premise of the book is that there is a group of thieves and criminals, and they plan on overthrowing the government.

What’s beautiful about it though, is that their entire plan is spoken about. We know exactly what steps need to be taken in order for this all to work.

Some might think it’s annoying because there is less suspense, but I firmly disagree with that. I think there is so much opportunity for suspense and potential failure that the story benefits from it.

There are some cheesy moments that all books fall prey to. Two people falling in love after meeting one night, ruining the plans you’d have to kill them is the first one that comes to mind.

In knowing the overall story, we just know that something will go wrong. There’s no way that the story can go perfectly as planned right? There’s no way our heroes can do exactly what they need to, cause where’s the fun in seeing them succeed so easily?

There is a sort of joy in seeing heroes struggle, even though we want them to win.

It’s sort of weird if you think about it. We all want the hero to win, so why do we want him to suffer and struggle? Why shouldn’t he win easily? Why do we want the hero to get beaten, battered, bloody and bruised.

We should want him to complete his goals with ease.

But that’s boring.

A story wouldn’t be much fun if we didn’t overcome some obstacles. That’s what makes them a hero though. They are a hero because they overcome great adversity and triumph in the face of defeat and despair.

A hero that struggles and goes through pain is a hero because of it. Because all that pain and hardship is what relates us to the words on a page, or the character on the screen.

Mistborn gives us two main heroes. Two characters that are the same in so many ways, but so different too.


My one big complaint about Mistborn and the world it is in is the “magic” system. What’s cool about it, Allomancy as it’s called, is that it uses metals that are absorbed into your body.

What isn’t so cool is that you sort of forget what each power does over time. Some of the powers are used enough, or are written in a certain way that the meaning comes across in a memorable way, but there are just about as many that you confuse.

Without spoiling anything, there are 8 different “powers” and each sort of has an opposite. Some of the powers are easy to understand, and the names for them give away their meaning.

Some of them aren’t really used often enough, so when they are mentioned it takes you a second to remember what power is being used.

Overall, fantastic book. I have the other two books in this trilogy and can’t wait to get my hands on them, but I promised myself I’d take a crack at IT before going back to The Wheel of Time, which I need to read before coming back again to Mistborn.


My question to you is simple, what is your favourite magic system that you’ve read. Harry Potter’s straight up wand use, or maybe Twilight’s magical creatures? Is it Game of Thrones subtle magical world, or something else entirely? Let me know in the comments.