Quote of the Day: The Name of The Wind

“When we are children we seldom think of the future. This innocence leaves us free to enjoy ourselves as few adults can. The day we fret about the future is the day we leave our childhood behind.” 
― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

“We understand how dangerous a mask can be. We all become what we pretend to be.” 
― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

“You have to be a bit of a liar to tell a story the right way.” 
― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

“Bones mend. Regret stays with you forever.” 
― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

“I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep. You may have heard of me.” 
― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

“You see, women are like fires, like flames. Some women are like candles, bright and friendly. Some are like single sparks, or embers, like fireflies for chasing on summer nights. Some are like campfires, all light and heat for a night and willing to be left after. Some women are like hearthfires, not much to look at but underneath they are all warm red coal that burns a long, long while.” 
― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

“Words are pale shadows of forgotten names. As names have power, words have power. Words can light fires in the minds of men. Words can wring tears from the hardest hearts. There are seven words that will make a person love you. There are ten words that will break a strong man’s will. But a word is nothing but a painting of a fire. A name is the fire itself.” 
― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind

Book Review: The Name of the Wind

I’ve written three different reviews for this book, and for some reason none of them are posting or saving in any way so I’m a bit annoyed and tired of the post, so I’ll keep the review short.

This book seems to have been gaining a bit of popularity since I read it a few years ago. I honestly can’t remember where I found it, or even where the book came from, but I’m glad it magically appeared on my shelves.

I liked the book a lot, especially seeing Kvothe grow up and discover the world, but I was not a fan of the time jumps that would happen every so often.

I wanted the time jumps to be more fleshed out, giving me a bit more of the main course of the story instead of making me upset that I wasn’t getting more story, but that might be my opinion.

Sorry again for the short post but I spent three hours today trying to make this post and it wasn’t working so I’m just going to admit defeat.